Elon Musk
Elon Musk

Elon Musk’s plan to fix our crap internet

ELON Musk's bold plan to send hundreds of satellites into space to deliver internet connections all over the globe has cleared another hurdle after being approved by the Australian Communications and Media Authority (ACMA).

Musk's SpaceX company, which is also working on space tourism, plans to create a constellation of satellites around the Earth to deliver broadband internet services.

A Falcon 9 SpaceX rocket with a payload of about 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network launched into space last month. Picture: AP Photo/John Raoux
A Falcon 9 SpaceX rocket with a payload of about 60 satellites for SpaceX’s Starlink broadband network launched into space last month. Picture: AP Photo/John Raoux

The company reckons the ambitious Starlink plan will cost $US10 billion or more to complete. (How they're managing to deliver internet worldwide for about a fifth of the cost of a national broadband network that will only service Australia is anyone's guess.)

SpaceX has already begun sending these satellites into space, but requires approval to have those satellites communicate with base stations on the ground.

But Starlink won't be without competition if it does end up operating in Australia, as companies Kepler Communications and Swarm Technologies have also been added to the list of foreign entities allowed to use satellites to communicate on frequencies in Australia's airspace.

ACMA regulates spectrum used by mobile network operators, radio stations and satellite operators to communicate over the airwaves.