MOO-VE OVER: Police say complaints of cows on the road are rising as drought drives the animals toward danger in the search for green grass.
MOO-VE OVER: Police say complaints of cows on the road are rising as drought drives the animals toward danger in the search for green grass.

Green pick lures cows, causes road hazards

POLICE are urging drivers to be aware of cows on roads, following an increase in the number of reports being made to police.

In the space of just two days, three complaints were made to police reporting hazards threatening driver safety on quiet Somerset roads.

Lowood Police Station Acting Senior Sergeant Dale Gough said the number of instances of cows on roads and feeding at the roadside had increased lately – causing concern to police.

“Basically, cows (are getting) on the road,” Sen-Sgt Gough said.

“Because of the green pick on the side of the road, we’re getting calls about cows getting out of their paddocks and staying on the side of the road.”

He said the drought may have played a role in the increase of complaints, as cows search for the green grass growing at the side of the road, where water gathers.

“They basically cause traffic hazards and we as police get called to these incidents and so does the local animal control.”

A cow was put down after it was hit by a car on Kipper Creek Road in Dundas.

“There was a crash earlier in the morning and a cow was hit and had to be put down, which is where we come in, as well – when they’re injured and need to be put down,” he said.

Sen-Sgt Gough said fixing broken fences and keeping an eye on gates could help keep cows contained and off the road.

“For people travelling on the road, take care … If you see cows, horses or even kangaroos on the side of the road, be vigilant,” he said.

“And, for landholders and stock owners, be vigilant in keeping fences in good order and keeping gates closed.”

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