CAPPING IT OFF: Natasha Anderson has given away 35 brightly coloured scrub caps to health workers in the region. Photo: Ebony Graveur
CAPPING IT OFF: Natasha Anderson has given away 35 brightly coloured scrub caps to health workers in the region. Photo: Ebony Graveur

Lockyer health workers receive 30+ homemade scrub caps

WHEN Natasha Anderson lost her job in the coronavirus crisis, she turned her attention to helping those in need.

With just a few basic sewing skills and the help of a video tutorial, she has sewn and distributed 35 scrub caps among health workers in the Lockyer Valley and Somerset – each unique, bright and eye-catching.

The self-taught seamstress from Lockyer Waters was inspired by her friend who was making homemade scrub caps to hand out at a hospital.

“My best friend is a nurse at Prince Charles Hospital and a sewer. She posted on Facebook about how she was making scrub caps for her colleagues,” Natasha said.

“I contacted my friend to tell her how amazing she was and to find out how I could help.”

Also known as surgical caps, scrub caps are fabric hats that keep hair covered and out of the way.

CRITICAL CAP: When Natasha Anderson lost her job due to coronavirus, she turned to volunteering and has since sewn and given away 35 brightly coloured scrub caps to health workers in the region. Photo: Ebony Graveur
CRITICAL CAP: When Natasha Anderson lost her job due to coronavirus, she turned to volunteering and has since sewn and given away 35 brightly coloured scrub caps to health workers in the region. Photo: Ebony Graveur

“I thought, what an awesome idea to give back to health workers that help people not only during COVID-19, but in general throughout our lives,” Natasha said.

“And to personally feel like I’m doing something useful to help after temporarily losing my job.”

The self-described “raw beginner sewer” joined Sewing Scrub Caps, a Facebook group that has communities of sewers across the world and nearly 2000 members.

She began sewing the scrub caps, choosing brightly-coloured fabric and aiming to distribute the hats among the region’s healthcare workers.

“We did a video call tutorial to help me get through my first one as I had never even used a pattern before,” she said.

“I have now made scrub caps using three different patterns.”

At the weekend, Natasha gave 35 scrub caps to health professionals in the region, after putting a call out on social media.
“I put the call out over our local groups as it seems a lot of the scrub caps were going to the larger hospitals and health workers,” she said.

“There are plenty of health facilities asking for the scrub caps, even if our area is covered – and every little bit helps.”