Politicians need to stop playing the blame game over jobs creation and unemployment.
Politicians need to stop playing the blame game over jobs creation and unemployment. Contributed

OPINION: Blame game over jobs gets us nowhere

POLITICAL spats and power plays over job-creation get us nowhere.

A Labor senator says the Hinkler MP is to blame for falling apprenticeship numbers while Keith Pitt says it's a former state Labor government's fault.

Meanwhile, where does that leave the people in our region desperate for jobs?

The political blame game is a mainstay of debates about jobs but it's not what we need.

People's livelihoods are at stake as unemployment numbers remain perilously low.

It's hard not to feel these livelihoods are being used as political pawns to score points.

If our politicians could resist taking potshots at each other, we could see there are real, long-term solutions being put in place.

As Mr Pitt points out, the Australian Apprenticeships Wage Subsidy trial creates genuine opportunities for business owners.

Major new builds in our cities, including the Rheinmetall Nioa Munitions factory and Hervey Bay Avion airport precinct development offer meaningful employment.

The practice of hurling blame is nothing new but wouldn't it be refreshing to see our politicians focus only on the positive developments?

Wouldn't it be nice to simply hear about solutions, rather than trying to get to the bottom of who put us in this mess?

Between high unemployment rates and news of unpaid subbies, there is plenty to wring our hands about on the jobs front.

But there is also plenty to celebrate, without resorting to a blame game.